A tool to find out if BGP is lying to you

APNIC has a bog article on detecting “bgp lies”.

https://blog.apnic.net/2021/05/24/a-tool-to-detect-bgp-lies/
Do you ever wonder whether you can really trust other networks, such as your provider(s) and peers? More precisely, wouldn’t you like to be able to tell if the traffic you send always flows through the paths received in the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)? Could it be that, for some prefixes, the forwarding path might differ?

Proper BGP DENY-ALL filter for mikrotik

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BGP, a single /24 and two diverse non-connected exit points

I am starting to see the following scenario more and more as IPv4 space is hard to get, but isn’t.

With ARIN it is still possible to get an IPv4 allotment. Many smaller ISPs qualify for a /24 and can get one if they wait long enough on the ARIN waiting list. a /24 of IPv4 space is the smallest block that 99% of the Internet allows to be advertised on the Capital I Internet. There are filter rules in place that drop smaller prefixes because that is the agreed upon norm.

So what happens if you are an ISP and you have a shiny new /24 but you have two networks which are not connected. Let’s look at our scenario.

The above network have no connectivity between the two of them on the internal side. These could be half way across the world or next door. If they were half way across the world it would make sense to try and get another /24. Maybe they are either side of a big mountain or one is down in a valley and there is no way to get a decent link between the two networks.

So what is a way you can use this /24 and still be able to assign IP addresses to both sides of the network? One way is to use a tunnel between your two edge routers.

Without the tunnel the scenario is traffic could come into network1, but if the IP is assigned on network 2 it will come back as unreachable. BGP is all about networks finding the shortest path to other networks. You don’t have much control over how networks find your public IP space if you have two providers advertising the same information. Some of the Internet will come in Network2 and some will come in Network1.

By running a tunnel between the two you can now subnet out that /24 into two eqal /25s and assign one /25 Network1 and one /25 to Network2 or however you want to. You can make the tunnel a GRE, EOIP, or other tunnel type. If I am using Mikrotik I prefer to use EOIP. If it’s another vendor I tend to use GRE.

Once the tunnel is established you can use static routing, OSPF, or your favorite IGP (interior Gateway Protocol) to “tell” one side about the routes on the other side. Let’s look at a fictional use.

In the above example our fictional ISP has an IPv4 block of 1.2.3.0/24. They have two networks separated by a tall mountain range in the center. It’s too cost prohibitive to run fiber or a wireless backhaul between the two networks so they have two different upstream providers. The ISP is advertising this /24 via BGP to Upstream1 from the Network 1 router. Network 2 router is also advertising the same /24 via BGP to Upstream 2.

We now create a Tunnel between the Mikrotiks. As mentioned before this can be EOIP, GRE, etc. We won’t go into the details of the tunnel but let’s assume the ISP is using Mikrotik. We create an EOIP tunnel (tons of tutorials out there) between Network 1 router and Network 2 router. Once this is established we will use 172.16.200.0/30 as our “Glue” on our tunnel interfaces at each side. Network 1 router gets 172.16.200.1/30. Network 2 router gets 172.16.200.2/30

To keep it simple we have a static route statement on the Network 1 Mikrotik router that looks like this:

/ip route add dst-address=1.2.3.129/25 gateway=172.16.200.2

This statement routes any traffic that comes in for 1.2.3.128/25 via ISP 1 to network1 across the tunnel to the Network 2 router. The Network 2 router then send it to the destination inside that side of the network.

Conversely, we have a similar statement in the Network 2 Mikrotik router

/ip route add dst-address=1.2.3.0/25 gateway=172.16.200.1

This statement routes any traffic that comes in for 1.2.3.0/25 via ISP 2 to network2 across the tunnel to the Network 2 router. The Network 2 router then send it to the destination inside that side of the network.

It’s as simple as that. You can apply this to any other vendor such as Cisco, Juniper, PFSense, etc. You also do not have to split the network into even /25’s like I did. You can choose to have os of the ips available on one side and route a /29 or something to the other side.

The major drawback of this scenario is you will takef a speed hit because if the traffic comes in one side and has to route across the tunnel it will have to go back out to the public internet and over to the other ISP.

#packetsdownrange

Mikrotik RouterOS and CPU usage

There always is a lot of talk about Mikrotik RouterOS CPU usage. I wanted to take a few minutes and go over a real-world example and explain some of the ins and outs when discussing Mikrotik CPU usage.

Let’s talk about the router in question. This is a CCR1016-12s-1S+. This is a 16 core 1.2GHz per core and 2GB RAM tilex based router. It is currently pulling in 1,764,849 IPv4 routes. There are two transit provider BGP feeds, multiple direct peers, an Internet Exchange peer to dual-route servers. The router handles a little over 3 gigs of routed traffic at peak times. Most of the traffic is on VLANs coming from a Cisco switch to the SFPPlus port.

One of the first things people turn on is the overall CPU usage within winbox. I like to think of this as an overall view of the CPUs on this router. Keep in mind there are 16.

Th next thing to investigate when it comes to CPU is to open up System..resources. Once there clock on CPU.

Mikrotik System..resources

It will then bring up a screen that looks like the following.

Oh My we have 100% CPU! Must replace this router ASAP! Calm down, remember you have 16 cores. So, why is this CPU at 100% and what ramifications does this have?

Remember earlier when we talked about BGP? In Mikrotik, BGP is not a multi-core aware process. This means BGP is limited to just one core to do it’s work. Since there are always routes being withdrawn and re-added to the routing table it is a busy process. Lots of math calculations going on. The key thing is this is expected behavior on a router running multiple BGP peers such as this one. This is not a bad thing, but not ideal. Throwing more cores at BGP is not the answer. Optimizing the process, as it has been done in V7 is the way to go.

If we expand the CPU window we will notice other processes are multi-core aware and.or are spreading their load among different cores.

As you can see we are in pretty good shape. We have a few CPUs above 50% utilization but, only a few. I will keep reminding you of the fact we have 16 of them.

Closing notes:
Diagnosing CPU issues can get a little complicated because routers like the 3011 have some have the majority of their ports shared with a single CPU bus.  https://wiki.mikrotik.com/images/f/f3/Switch_chip_block_diagram.png. As you can tell in the diagram there are 5 ports which share 1 Gig to the CPU.  The fact that an actual switch chip with hardware offloading is in the middle helps, but the bus is still oversold.  This is one reason consolidating routers to an actual switch will make a difference.  

Janis Megis from Mikrotik had presentation at MUM, which is a little older now, still sheds a lot of light on how Mikrotik CPU works.  https://mum.mikrotik.com/presentations/US10/Megis.pdf There is some pretty interesting stuff starting on page 14

With Mikrotik switching to ARM processors we will see huge differences with them and RotuerOS7. We will see less cores, but better utilization of those cores. The new 2004 with all SFP and 2 25 gig ports only has 4 CPU.

So the next time you look at a router, take a few moments to see how utilized the entire CPU architecture is instead of just one CPU.

#packetsdownrange #mikrotik

Hurricane Electric Route Filtering Algorithm

The following is from http://routing.he.net/algorithm.html . This outlines the criteria HE.NET uses for filtering routes from peers and customers.

This is the route filtering algorithm for customers and peers that have explicit filtering:

1. Attempt to find an as-set to use for this network.
1.1 Inspect the aut-num for this ASN to see if we can extract from their IRR policy for what they would announce to Hurricane by finding export or mp-export to AS6939, ANY, or AS-ANY.
1.2 Also see if they set what looks like a valid IRR as-set name in peeringdb.

2. Collect the received routes for all BGP sessions with this ASN. This details both accepted and filtered routes.

3. For each route, perform the following rejection tests:
3.1 Reject default routes 0.0.0.0/0 and ::/0.
3.2 Reject paths using BGP AS_SET notation (i.e. {1} or {1 2}, etc). See draft-ietf-idr-deprecate-as-set-confed-set.
3.3 Reject prefix lengths less than minimum and greater than maximum. For IPv4 this is 8 and 24. For IPv6 this is 16 and 48.
3.4 Reject bogons (RFC1918, documentation prefix, etc).
3.5 Reject exchange prefixes for all exchanges Hurricane Electric is connected to.
3.6 Reject routes that have RPKI status INVALID_ASN or INVALID_LENGTH based on the origin AS and prefix.

4. For each route, perform the following acceptance tests:
4.1 If the origin is the neighbor AS, accept routes that have RPKI status VALID based on the origin AS and prefix.
4.2 If the prefix is an announced downstream route that is a subnet of an accepted originated prefix that was accepted due to either RPKI or an RIR handle match, accept the prefix.
4.3 If RIR handles match for the prefix and the peer AS, accept the prefix.
4.4 If this prefix exactly matches a prefix allowed by the IRR policy of this peer, accept the prefix.
4.5 If the first AS in the path matches the peer and path is two hops long and the origin AS is in the expanded as-set for the peer AS and either the RPKI status is VALID or there is an RIR handle match for the origin AS and the prefix, accept the prefix.

5. Reject all prefixes not explicitly accepted

Don’t try this at home kids. Automated BGP Optimization

https://radar.qrator.net/blog/as10990-routing-optimization-tale
Conclusion? Do not try to optimize the routes with automated software – BGP is a distance-vector routing protocol that has proved, throughout the years, its ability to handle the traffic. Software, wanting to “optimize” the system involving thousands of members would never be smart enough to compute all the possible outcomes of such manipulation.

Network troubleshooting tools

Recently, there was a thread on the NANOG list asking what were somne favorite network troubleshooting tools. I have taken many of these tools and created the following list.

http://ping.pe/
Simple pingport and dig commands

https://mtr.sh/
BGP Looking glass

https://perfops.net/mtr-from-world
Traceroute from various hosts on the net

http://www.traceroute6.net/
IPV6 tools (ping,traceroute,etc)

https://dnsviz.net/
Carious DNS tools

http://irrexplorer.nlnog.net/
Routing Registry object explorer

https://mxtoolbox.com/
DNS and Mail tools

Hurricane Electric now requires IRR and filters invalid RPKI

If you are a Hurricane Electric customer you may be receiving e-mails like the following:

Dear ASXXX,

Routing Security Report for ASXXX

Hurricane Electric cares about your routing security.  We filter all BGP sessions using prefix filters based on IRR and RPKI.

This report is being sent to help you identify prefixes which may need either their IRR or RPKI information created or updated 
and to also help you identify possibly hijacked routes you may be accepting and reannouncing.  

Routes with RPKI status INVALID_ASN strongly indicate a serious problem.

IPv4 SUMMARY

Routes accepted: 3
Routes rejected: 3
Routes with RPKI status VALID: 0
Routes with RPKI status INVALID: 0

IPv6 SUMMARY

Routes accepted: 1
Routes rejected: 0
Routes with RPKI status VALID: 0
Routes with RPKI status INVALID: 0

We currently do not have a valid as-set name for your network.  Please add an export line to your aut-num ASXXXX 
that references your as-set name.  For example,

export: to AS-ANY announce your-as-set-name

If you do not currently have an as-set, we recommend you create one named ASXXXX:AS-ALL

Your as-set should contain just your ASN and your customers' ASNs and/or as-sets (not your peers or upstream providers).

What does this mean for you as a service provider? If you use Hurricane Electric as transit or peer with them on an exchange you will need to have ROAs for your blocksand have routing registry objects. I did a tutorial based upon Arin which can be found at: https://blog.j2sw.com/networking/routing-registries-and-you/

In short you need to do the following:

  • Create a mntner object (equivalent of a user account) to give you the ability to create IRR objects in your selected IRR database
  • Create an aut-num to represent your autonomous system and describe its contact information (admin and technical) and your routing policy
  • Create an as-set to describe which autonous system numbers your peers should expect to see from you (namely your own and your transit customers)
  • Create a route/route6 object for every prefix originated from your network
  • Update your peeringdb profile to include your IRR peering policy
  • Generate RPKI https://www.arin.net/resources/manage/rpki/roa_request/#creating-a-roa-in-arin-online

Clarification:
Some folks are confusing having valid ROAs with your router supporting RPKI with route origin validation in real-time. These two are separate things. You create ROA records with your RIR, such as ARIN, which has nothing to do with route validation on your router.

Also, HE is filtering any RPKI INVALID routes. Does this mean they are requiring RPKI? You be the judge.



CCR1016 BGP route pull down

This morning I had a Mikrotik CCR1016 where I had to change the router ID, which caused all the sessions to reset. The following is a screenshot of the time it took to re-learn all of the peers. Obviously, the smaller prefixes were learned pretty quickly. It took about 10 minutes to learn two full IPv4 route tables and about 5 minutes to learn the IPv6 routing tables.

This is why I always get full routes plus a default from the upstream when it warrants full routes. This way I can have slow convergence time like this and still have traffic flowing.

Mikrotik BGP firewall rules for security

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