What is routing? MANRS

The Internet has over 68,000 publicly visible networks, which means it’s impractical to know about the existence of every other network or how they’re connected. Networks can also appear and disappear, whilst connections are constantly coming and going due to various faults and reconfigurations. This makes it too complex to take manual decisions about how to route packets across the Internet.

RPKI and misconceptions

After my blog post about Hurricane Electric and RPKi support, I was seeing some comments by folks that warrant some clarification. I put together a short midnight podcast on this.  To summarize
1. route original validation is not the same as having ROA’S with your RIR
2. If you have an ASN you should have a peering DB entry
3.ROAs have nothing to do with your router supporting RPKI

ARIN resources and the Service Provider

Internet Service Providers (ISPs) can be intimidated by all of the facets of working with the American Registry of Internet Numbers (ARIN). I have put together a guide that outlines common things you, as a service provider, need to do.

This guide is not an end-all how-to. Throughout, I am posting videos and links taken from the ARIN site to help. This article is more of an outline of what a service provider needs to do.

The majority of the steps below will be done through ARIN’s online ticketing system.

This is broken down into the following Sections
1. Create a Point of Contact (POC) record
2. Creating an Organization (ORG-ID)
3. Requesting an Autonomous System Number (ASN)
4. Requesting IPv6 space
5. Requesting IPV4 space
6. Source Validation
7. Reverse DNS
8. Routing Registry
9. RPKI
10. Notes and tips

Creating a Point of Contact (POC)
Point of Contact (POC) records are the foundation of your ARIN account. This record is the way you manage your resources. There are different types of POC accounts. https://www.arin.net/resources/guide/account/records/poc/ will tell you everything you need to know about POC records. Creating this record will take mere minutes to make.

Creating an Organization
Once you have a POC record created, you will create an Organization and associate your POC with that ORG-ID. ARIN will attach your resources to your org-id. You will need your federal EIN and your registered business address for this stage. This stage takes a few days to get verified due to ARIN needing to verify you are who you say you are

Requesting an ASN
An Autonomous System Number (ASN) will be the first resource an ISP will request. The ASN allows you to participate in BGP by advertising your IP blocks to peers. The ASN will require to state your routing policy, usually BGP, and at least two peers, you will be establishing BGP. If you don’t have two peers, say your plans in this section.

Once you have met the criteria and you will be asked to fill out an officer attest paper. This statement is a paper stating the information you have submitted is correct and truthful. Once you will out this form and submit it you will then receive an invoice. Once this invoice is paid, you will receive your ASN. This stage can take several days, depending on how much back and forth goes on, asking to clarify information.

Request IPv6 space
I put this as the next stage for a few reasons. The first is you should be moving toward IPv6. At the very least, dual-stack your network. Second, requesting IPV6 space will get you familiar with how ARIN looks at requests.

You are required to state how your network is laid out, what type of network, and how you plan to deploy addresses. Be prepared to give a diagram of your system. You may have to go back and forth a few times, depending on how much detail you provided on your first request.

Just like your ASN, you will be required to sign another office attest, pay the bill, and then the Ip space will be allocated.

Requesting IPV4 space
Requesting IPV4 space is pretty close to requesting V6 space, but ARIN is more strict on their criteria these days due to the shortage of space. If you are looking to transition you can get. /24 of v4 for your v6 transition.

If you choose to request IPV4 space you will be put on a waiting list with others who have also requested space. Details on the waiting list can be found at https://www.arin.net/resources/guide/ipv4/waiting_list/ . ARIN is currently doing quarterly distributions to folks on the waitlist*. I put an asterisk on the previous statement because there are several variables listed at the waitlist site linked above. Some include:

  • Only organizations holding an aggregate of a /20 or less of IPv4 address space may apply and be approved.
  • The maximum-size aggregate that an organization may qualify for at any one time is a /22.

The site says they do quarterly distributions. I believe this gives ARIN time to reclaim IP space and do a cleanup on it. Depending on when you submit you may have to wait several months or longer for an allocation.

As with V6 space and ASN, you have to do another officer attest, pay your invoice, and then it is allocated.

Origin AS
Origin AS validation is a check and balance. From Arin’s https://www.arin.net/resources/registry/originas/
The Origin Autonomous System (AS) field is an optional field collected by ARIN during all IPv4 and IPv6 block transactions (allocation and assignment requests, reallocation and reassignment actions, transfer and experimental requests). This additional field is used by IP address block holders (including legacy address holders) to record a list of the Autonomous System Numbers (ASNs), separated by commas or whitespace, from which the addresses in the address block(s) may originate.

This is simply a field you fill in on your ARIN account. When you get IP space from ARIN this is *usually* automatic.

Reverse DNS
You will need to point your IP blocks to your or hosted DNS servers for the reverse entries. Many different entities pay attention to reverse DNS entries. If you have clients who run mail servers or similar services, you will need a reverse DNS entry. More information at https://www.arin.net/resources/manage/reverse/

Routing Registry
More and more companies, such as Hurricane Electric, are requiring routing registry entries. I did a pretty in-depth article on routing registries. https://blog.j2sw.com/networking/routing-registries-and-you/
ARIN now has a web-based system for setting up route objects. This web mehtod takes some of the learning curve out of adding things into the ARIN registry. Many exchanges, including FD-IX, are moving toward routing registry support.

RPKI
RPKI is another validation method for verifying you are the proper owner of resources, especially IP blocks. https://www.arin.net/resources/manage/rpki/ . Hosted RPKI is the easiest way to get started with RPKI.

I did an article related to RPKI at https://blog.j2sw.com/networking/bgp/hurricane-electric-now-requires-irr-and-rpki/

Notes
Working with ARIN is a pretty straightforward, but sometimes confusing for the newbie. I offer a package for $799 (plus ARIN fees) where I do all the above for you. I have done this so much over the years we have templates and other shortcuts for the various things done.

If you choose to do this on your own some tips.
1. Don’t be afraid to provide more detail than asked.
2. The ARIN helpdesk is actually helpful. If you get stuck call or e-mail them. They have probably answered your question before and are willing to help.
3. Be prepared to provide information about your network, especially with IPv4 requests. ARIN is wanting to know if you are/will be using resources efficiently.

If you get IPv4 space I would recommend adding the new IP block to your advertisements. Allow it to be learned by the various reverse Geolocation folks. After a week check your blocks using the links on this page: http://thebrotherswisp.com/index.php/geo-and-vpn/. This applies to space allocated from ARIN or purchased from a broker.

If you are looking to purchase blocks for a broker, yu need to get pre-approval from ARIN. Learn more at https://www.arin.net/resources/registry/transfers/preapproval/

The problem with routing registries

Anyone who has followed me or I have done IP work for knows I am a fan of Internet Routing Registries (IRR).  However, there is a glaring issue with these registries.  I will use the example I ran into today.

A downstream client of a WISP client bought 67.158.57.0/24 off the open market about a year ago.  They finally have things in place where they are looking to announce this IP space to the world.  I helped them set up BGP to my client ISP and sent out the normal LOAs to the upstream providers.  I received this back from Hurricane Electric.

The IRR entry for this prefix does not list 14333.
https://www.radb.net/query?keywords=67.158.57.0%2F24
Please update IRR and let me know. I can add this to your prefix filter.

And a Subsequent followup message

I can add this prefix to your filter, based on the LOA. However the reason we require IRR entries for prefixes is because our peers only accept our re-announcements if there are correct IRR entries authorizing the announcement. 

Can you confirm what the source ASN will be for this announcement?
If a customer of yours is going to re-announce this to you, and that ASN is listed on:
https://www.radb.net/query?keywords=67.158.57.0%2F24
Then this will work. However if you plan to announce this sourced from your ASN 14333, this will not be picked up past our network.

This highlights one of the glaring issues with registries.  There are no checks and balances when it comes to stale data in registries. The same is true with access lists in provider routers.

What I am guessing happened is when the /20 block was carved up and sold it’s information was never removed from the routing registry.  Since this is RADb and it does not talk directly with ARIN we have some inconsistencies going on.

The following RFC illustrates many of the issues folks run into.
https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7682
From the summary of the document

As discussed above, many of the problems that have traditionally stifled IRR deployment have, themselves, become historical. However, there are still real operational considerations that limit IRR usage from realizing its full effectiveness.

To further complicate this Hurricane Electric is referencing data in RADb, which is a paid registry.

So what are am I going to have to do? In order to make this right, I will have to reach out to RADB and have them edit the registry to start with. Since this customer, nor the ISP, are members of RADb it will take time.

My Mum 2019 BGP presentation

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How VRFs work

From Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_routing_and_forwarding
virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) is a technology that allows multiple instances of a routing table to co-exist within the same router at the same time. One or more logical or physical interfaces may have a VRF and these VRFs do not share routes therefore the packets are only forwarded between interfaces on the same VRF

Need an ASN, IP space? I have a package for you.

Are you intimidated by getting an ASN to participate in BGP? Do you not have the time to learn all the ins and out of dealing with ARIN to get IP space or routing registries? Let me help you.

The ARIN starter package
-Organization ID and POC IDs setup
-Paperwork to get your own ASN
-Paperwork for your own IPV6 allocation
-Paperwork for an IPV4 /24
-ASN validation
-Documentation and maintenance documents
Cost $899 plus ARIN fees

Add Ons
-RPKI Setup $199
-Routing Registry setup $199

Add-ons are priced to add-on to the starter package.  Please let me know if you need just the add-ons for a proper quote.

Cisco ORF (Outbound route filtering)

Outbound Route Filtering (ORF) is a Cisco proprietary feature that prevents the unnecessary exchanging of routes that are subject to inbound filtering. This, in turn, minimizes bandwidth across the links and reduces CPU cycles upon the router during the processing of the neighbor UPDATE.

ORF works by the router transmitting its inbound filters to its neighbor, which the neighboring router then applies outbound.

great article on how to do this if you are running Cisco routers and your provider is too.

https://community.cisco.com/t5/networking-documents/bgp-orf-outbound-route-filtering-capability/ta-p/3153286

For Patreon Subscribers: Access to Mikrotik Speedtest servers

I am happy to announce a special new tier for my Patreon subscribers. I have now installed a network of speedtest servers in 15 locations in the United States and one overseas as part of stage 1. Patreon subscribers who subscribe to this extra tier of service will be presented with a members-only username and password for testing to each of these.

Stage two will be a looking glass so you can test how your BGP routes look in various spots on the Internet. You will know what Upstreams each location has to better assist you in diagnosing BGP or just getting a view of how your network interacts with the Internet.

Visit my Patreon Page for more details.