SouthWest ISP regional meetup July 12, 2019

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-southwest-isp-regional-meetup-tickets-63089643823

This meeting is open to any and all Internet Service Providers in Texas, as well as anyone else willing to come to our Great State! You don’t have to be a WISPA member to attend. Come meet with fellow operators, see all the greatness of the Ericsson Headquarters, and hear topics from various knowledge experts.

NTIA launches Funding web-site

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration released a searchable database of 50 federal broadband programs. They span a dozen federal agencies with billions of dollars for broadband grants, loans and other resources. Participating federal agencies helped create the database. It fulfills a goal set out in the American Broadband Initiative announced in February to make it easier for community leaders to find federal funding and permitting information.

#funding #broadband

Remote Peering

Martin J. Levy from Cloudflare did a presentation about remote peering possibly being a bad thing. In this presentation, he brings up several valid points.

https://www.globalpeeringforum.org/pastEvents/gpf14/presentations/Wed_2_MartinLevy_remote_peering_is_bad_for.pdf

Some thoughts of my own.

Yes, remote peering is happening.  One thing touched upon is the layer3 vs layer2 traffic.  We at MidWest-IX only allow remote peering at a layer2 level unless it is groups like routeviews.org or other non-customer traffic situations.

Many providers are overselling their backbone and transit links.  This oversubscription means access to content networks in places that do not have an exchange or places that do have the content locally can suffer through no fault of the ISP or the content provider.  We have situations with content folks like Netflix who do not join for-profit IXes at the moment, keeping the content further away from customers.  These customers are reaching Netflix through the same transit connections many other providers are.  The can result in congested ports and poor quality for the customer.  The ISP is left trying to find creative ways to offload that traffic.  An Internet Exchange is ideal for these companies because cross-connect charges within data centers are on the rise.

When we first turned up MidWest-IX, now known as FD-IX, in Indianapolis we used a layer2 connection to Chicago to bring some of the most needed peers down to our members.  This connection allowed us to kick-start our IX.  We had one member, who after peering with their top talkers, actually saw an increase in bandwidth.  The data gained told the member that their upstream providers were having a bottleneck issue. They had suspected this for a while, but this confirmed it. Either the upstream provider had a congested link, or their peering ports were getting full.

As content makes it way closer remote peering becomes less and less of an issue.  There are many rural broadband companies just now getting layer2 transport back to carrier hotels. These links may stretch a hundred miles or more to reach the data center.  The rural broadband provider will probably never get a carrier hotel close to them.  As they grow, they might be able to afford to host caching boxes. The additional cost and pipe size to fill the caches is also a determining factor. The tradeoff of hosting and filling multiple cache boxes outweighs the latency of a layer2 circuit back to a carrier hotel.

I think remote peering is necessary to by-pass full links which give the ISP more control over their bandwidth.  In today’s race to cut corners to improve the bottom line having more control over your own network is a good thing. By doing a layer2 remote peer you might actually cut down on your latency, even if your upstream ISP is peered or has cache boxes.

Indiana 2019 ISP meeting May 16th

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-indiana-isp-meeting-tickets-60311319781

We are pleased to announce the 2019 Indiana Internet Service Providers (ISP) meeting on May 16th 2019. This meeting is open to Internet Service Providers in Indiana. You don’t have to be a WISPA member to attend. Registration is limited to 60 attendees at this time.

Address for the meeting will be:

Indianapolis WinGate Airport Hotel
5797 Rockville Rd
Indianapolis, IN 46224

Last Years Agenda – To be updated.

7:00-800- Registration and Coffee

8:00-8:30 – Opening & Introductions – Vendor Spotlight

8:30-8:45 – Session 1 – State of Indiana Topics / Senator

8:45-9:00 – Avoiding analysis paralysis with monitoring – Adam Kennedy

9:00-9:45 – Steve Coran

9:15-10:00 – Session 4

10:00-10:15 – Technology Update for WISPS (small cells and other hot Topics) -Justin Wilson

10:15-10:40 – Using Drones for Site Surveys – WISPr Systems – Conor Ferguson

10:40-11:00 – Session 7

11:00-12:30 – Roundtable & Vendor Visit Time

12:30 – Adjournment – Track info

1:00pm – Lunch @ Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LifeLIne DC Track Suite.
– Indy 500 Practice Day & Social

The schedule may adjust as the date gets closer.

We will have a Hot continental breakfast bar. Includes Eggs, Meat, Potatoes, Biscuit and Gravy, Cereals, Fruit, Apple and Orange Juice, Bagels, Danishes & make your own-waffles and pancakes. Coffee & Tea.

Look for more information to come on our facebook and Social Media pages.

Form 477 Resources

https://transition.fcc.gov/Forms/Form477/477inst.pdf
lots of good information in here


https://www.fcc.gov/general/broadband-deployment-data-fcc-form-477

Who Files What?

  • All facilities-based broadband providers are required to file data with the FCC twice a year (Form 477) on where they offer Internet access service at speeds exceeding 200 kbps in at least one direction.
  • Fixed providers file lists of census blocks in which they can or do offer service to at least one location, with additional information about the service.*
  • Mobile providers file maps of their coverage areas for each broadband technology (e.g., EV-DO, HSPA, LTE).  See Mobile Deployment Data.

https://www.fcc.gov/general/form-477-orders-and-releases


https://www.fcc.gov/economics-analytics/industry-analysis-division/form-477-resources/generating-fixed

Generating Fixed Broadband Deployment Data for FCC Form 477


https://geobuffer.com/
Turn US addresses into coordinates.

Calea and the ISP

The Communications and Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) passed in 1994 is a piece of legislation every U.S. ISP should know about and be in compliance with.  If for the simple fact the government can levy heavy fines if you aren’t compliant.

For those of you wanting some background please follow these links:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Assistance_for_Law_Enforcement_Act

https://www.fcc.gov/public-safety-and-homeland-security/policy-and-licensing-division/general/communications-assistance

First of all CALEA isn’t simply sticking wireshark onto your network and sending a packet dump to a law enforcement agency. It is much more complicated than that. You have several things which the CALEA standard addresses.

1.The ability to send multiple streams, in real time, to different law enforcement agencies.
2.The ability to not interrupt the connection to a person of interest.  In other words you don’t want to interrupt their connection to insert a piece of hardware.
3.The ability to provide just the information on the warrant.  Too much information can actually violate the court order.
4.There is a difference between a typical “request for information” warrant and a CALEA request.  These are not the same.  CALEA almost always comes from a federal agency. They are expecting you to be compliant with CALEA.

Now, here is where things get a little subjective.  The FBI has https://askcalea.fbi.gov/ which is linked from the above fcc.gov web-site.  The askcalea web-site has not been updated since 2011.  The service provider login and service provider registration simply does not work. The information about CALEA is pretty outdated.

So what does this mean for you as a small ISP? Stay tuned for more information.