Denial of Service and the xISP Part 1

Most service providers have been the victim of a Denial of Service (DoS) attack at one point or another. Sometimes you may not realize you are under an attack. A few months ago, I posted a simple screenshot at https://blog.j2sw.com/networking/anatomy-of-a-ddos/ of what an active DDoS looks like.

Types of Attacks
In order to know what to look for you have to understand the four basic types of attacks. I will outline this and talk about how modern attacks are affecting Internet Service Providers (ISPs). In my next article, we will talk about identifying these types of attacks and some mitigation techniques you can employ.

Throw everything at you attack aka Buffer overflow
This type of attack is throwing enormous amounts of traffic at you to fill up your switch and router buffers, causing the device to exceed its capabilities. Your devices become crushed by an overwhelming volume of data throw at them. This attack isn’t always sheer bandwidth. Sometimes it is tens of thousands of remote connections.

Attacking vulnerable protocols
Attackers go after exposed services like ICMP to do amplification attacks. Fragmented packets, which keep the router tied up are also a common method of attacking a host.

Application attacks
These are the ones most consumers hear about. Vulnerabilities in operating systems, applications, and packages are exploited and used in attacks.

Hacks
The fourth kind is not lumped in with Application attacks, but I wanted to separate it for a few reasons. The first reason is that someone compromising a system is not always sophisticated. If a bad actor guessed the password on your router and erased the configuration, they have performed a Denial of Service against you. If you don’t keep your software up-to-date and someone exploits a backdoor and “hacks” your system, they have performed of DoS attack.

Modern Attacks against networks
Modern DoS attacks are always evolving. As network administrators find ways to mitigate these attacks, the bad actors find ways to tweak them and get around mitigation techniques employed by providers. Most of the exploits above involve sheer volumes of traffic or connections being directed at a host to take it offline. This attack is especially detrimental for service providers because it takes your customers offline if the attack is significant enough.

One of the most common techniques these days is the Distributed Denial of Service attack (DDoS). These are usually botnets involving thousands of compromised machines or devices acting against a host(s). These can be anywhere in the world. They could even be users inside your network with compromised machines or other devices. Distributed attacks are hard to mitigate because they can be legitimate traffic pointed at a web-server as an example. The traffic is not malicious from a technical perspective. You have thousands and thousands of machines sending legitimate requests to a web-server or other host on your network. This traffic looks legitimate but is overwhelming for your hardware and Internet pipe.

Image courtesy of https://www.imperva.com/blog/how-to-identify-a-mirai-style-ddos-attack/

So what does a DDoS look like and what are your options when it comes to Denial of Service Attacks? In my next article in this series, I will talk about some best practices you can do so you are not as vulnerable to these types of attacks.

Garmin gets hit with Ransomware

https://www.forbes.com/sites/barrycollins/2020/07/25/will-garmin-pay-10m-ransom-to-end-two-day-outage/#2e6983423164

Garmin is reportedly being asked to pay a $10 million ransom to free its systems from a cyberattack that has taken down many of its services for two days.

The navigation company was hit by a ransomware attack on Thursday, leaving customers unable to log fitness sessions in Garmin apps and pilots unable to download flight plans for aircraft navigation systems, among other problems. The company’s communication systems have also been taken offline, leaving it unable to respond to disgruntled customers.

Garmin employees have told BleepingComputer that the company was struck down by the WastedLocker ransomware.

Mikrotik BGP firewall rules for security

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Updated Mikrotik firewall script from Rick Frey

Our friend Rick Frey has updated his Mikrotik Firewall script.  You can find it here
http://rickfreyconsulting.com/rfc-mikrotik-firewall-6-0-for-ipv4-free-version/

You will need a fairly beefy router to run all of this.  If you are an enterprise this will be very handy for protecting your corporate network.  If you are an ISP I would pick and choose some of the parts which apply to you.  Your infrastructure should already be on non accessible IP space so the need for this big of a firewall should not be necessary

Equinix Customers – New Access requirements coming in October

For anyone with equipment inside Equinix facilities you need to complete a security profile. This goes into place in October. The below is from their e-mail.

Starting in October, we will provide more efficient access to Equinix IBX locations in a globally consistent process, from the front door of the IBX to your cage. To benefit from this new process as soon as it is available, take action now!

Please complete your Security Profile in the Equinix Customer Portal (ECP) by providing the following information:

  • Add a Headshot Photo
  • Create a Global 6-digit PIN
  • Sign the Global IBX Access Form
  • Provide an Electronic Signature

Once your Security Profile is complete you will receive a unique QR code, which can be accessed via the ECP or the ECP mobile application. Beginning October 21st, you will be able to use your unique QR code at the IBX Access Kiosk for an expedited security entrance process.

Corporate vs ISP networks for the ISP

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Circle City Con 7.0

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/circlecitycon-70-tickets-62810947234

Continuing our year after year record breaking attendance, CircleCityCon 7.0 promises to test our limits and deliver to you a conference unique from all the others.

Since Circle 1 we have delivered trainings for free with the option to reserve a seat for a modest fee. Since Circle 2 we brought the arcades in. Since Circle 3 we have put on fun themes and stories attendees will enjoy participating in, or feel free to ignore, since Circle 4 we have put on game shows, since Circle 5 we have started adding to the villages with a hardware hacking village, we continued that in Circle 6 adding the biohacking and blue team village. We also started a job fair which we hope to continue.

What will CircleCityCon 7.0 be like? What will we do? What wonders and amazing features do we have to release? ……. Not even we know.

But in August, we will give you a peek…….

Defcon News: Vulnerable Windows Drivers

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