Podcast: Cameron Kilton from Alpha and I talk about LTE

Cameron Kilton from Alpha Wireless and i sit down at the 2019 Indiana ISP meeting and talk about LTE and Wireless operators.  Pardon the rough beginning. the room we were in had a flickering light that took me by surprise near the beginning and messed with my rhythm.

Cameron’s Twitter
https://twitter.com/cameronkilton

Alpha Wireless
https://alphawireless.com/

CBRSCertified Professional Installer (CPI Package)

This six-module program, developed by Google, will train you to be a Certificated Professional Installer (CPI) of radios which utilize the Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) band to provide communications infrastructure. Upon completing the course and passing the online certification exam*, you will receive your CPI credentials* and your information will be automatically registered with WInnForum*.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/google-cbrs-cpi-training

Ubiquiti releases EdgeMAX EdgeSwitch software 1.8.2

From their announcement

A new software release for EdgeSwitch (all current models) is available here:

EdgeSwitch 1G switch models: ES-48-750W, ES-48-500W, ES-24-500W, ES-24-250W, ES-48-Lite, ES-24-Lite, ES-16-150W, ES-12F,ES-8-150W, EP-S16.

Normal version:
https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/edgemax/EdgeSwitch/v1.8.2/ES-eswh.v1.8.2.5192445.stk
(SHA1: b1f66416276ef7de9abd5d2c50fa79b75d1bfe49) (GPL archive)

LITE version:
https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/edgemax/EdgeSwitch/v1.8.2/ES-eswh.v1.8.2-lite.5192445.stk

(SHA1: 47c11f3ce06d77e450a480877e06d2e72a6c6192)

Mib files:

https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/edgemax/EdgeSwitch/v1.8.2/ES-eswh.v1.8.2.5192445-mibs.tar.gz

(SHA1: 85b3acb15923b94f25bc965a98f72d24a4dac1f1)

EdgeSwitch 10G switch model: ES-16-XG
Normal version:

https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/edgemax/EdgeSwitch/v1.8.2/ES-esgh.v1.8.2.5192445.stk
(SHA1: 4aa6412e4736e9a1314700af3c7d05c61500d20b) (GPL archive)

LITE version:

https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/edgemax/EdgeSwitch/v1.8.2/ES-esgh.v1.8.2-lite.5192445.stk
(SHA1: 0e627ec330e3ec38feca97a2564be701f40ae246)

Mib files:

https://dl.ubnt.com/firmwares/edgemax/EdgeSwitch/v1.8.2/ES-esgh.v1.8.2.5192445-mibs.tar.gz

(SHA1: cb726e10689de0004d08ccc6d26beeec5a9f3f60)

Bug fixes and enhancements

  • [VLAN] reduce maximum VLAN number from 4093 to 256 (Only in Lite version).
  • [SECURITY] fix some issues in the Legacy UI.
  • [SECURITY] fix injection issue in CLI command.
  • [SYSTEM][ESWH] improve system stability.
  • [SYSTEM][ESWH] improve compatibility with SFP+ module (UF-SM-10G-S).
  • [SYSTEM] fix bugs with some specific cases in config checker.
  • [SYSTEM] fix time range multi entries issue.
  • [SYSTEM] add CLI command ‘show mbuf detail’.
  • [SYSTEM] add check for memory tuning.
  • [SYSTEM] reduce the memory usage in firmware upgrade.
  • [DHCP_RELAY] check invalid VLAN value.
  • [DNS] synchronize the static ip-host in system.
  • [CLI][Legacy UI] update copyright for 2019.

Remote Peering

Martin J. Levy from Cloudflare did a presentation about remote peering possibly being a bad thing. In this presentation, he brings up several valid points.

https://www.globalpeeringforum.org/pastEvents/gpf14/presentations/Wed_2_MartinLevy_remote_peering_is_bad_for.pdf

Some thoughts of my own.

Yes, remote peering is happening.  One thing touched upon is the layer3 vs layer2 traffic.  We at MidWest-IX only allow remote peering at a layer2 level unless it is groups like routeviews.org or other non-customer traffic situations.

Many providers are overselling their backbone and transit links.  This oversubscription means access to content networks in places that do not have an exchange or places that do have the content locally can suffer through no fault of the ISP or the content provider.  We have situations with content folks like Netflix who do not join for-profit IXes at the moment, keeping the content further away from customers.  These customers are reaching Netflix through the same transit connections many other providers are.  The can result in congested ports and poor quality for the customer.  The ISP is left trying to find creative ways to offload that traffic.  An Internet Exchange is ideal for these companies because cross-connect charges within data centers are on the rise.

When we first turned up MidWest-IX, now known as FD-IX, in Indianapolis we used a layer2 connection to Chicago to bring some of the most needed peers down to our members.  This connection allowed us to kick-start our IX.  We had one member, who after peering with their top talkers, actually saw an increase in bandwidth.  The data gained told the member that their upstream providers were having a bottleneck issue. They had suspected this for a while, but this confirmed it. Either the upstream provider had a congested link, or their peering ports were getting full.

As content makes it way closer remote peering becomes less and less of an issue.  There are many rural broadband companies just now getting layer2 transport back to carrier hotels. These links may stretch a hundred miles or more to reach the data center.  The rural broadband provider will probably never get a carrier hotel close to them.  As they grow, they might be able to afford to host caching boxes. The additional cost and pipe size to fill the caches is also a determining factor. The tradeoff of hosting and filling multiple cache boxes outweighs the latency of a layer2 circuit back to a carrier hotel.

I think remote peering is necessary to by-pass full links which give the ISP more control over their bandwidth.  In today’s race to cut corners to improve the bottom line having more control over your own network is a good thing. By doing a layer2 remote peer you might actually cut down on your latency, even if your upstream ISP is peered or has cache boxes.

Soundproofing your server room

Recently I was asked techniques for soundproofing a server room to keep the noise down in a small to medium-sized office.  Before the discussion dives into the article, there are a few things to keep in mind

1. Don’t let the soundproofing aspect overtake the airflow aspect.  Airflow is critical.
2. Make sure your solution meets fire and building codes.
3. Mass always wins when it comes to soundproofing.

Now on to some ideas.
Acoustic Foam
https://www.thefoamfactory.com/acousticfoam/acousticfoam.html

Ceiling Tiles
Ceiling tiles are typically sound absorbent, but you can get some with higher absorption than others.

Soundproofing on the cabinet
For those of you familiar with high-end car stereos know products like Dynamat and other sound deading materials. The work in two ways.  The first is by adding mass to what the are applied to. Secondly, they are made of materials specially designed to absorb sound. There are many kinds of these on the market. One such product is here on Amazon

Other techniques
Keeping the air conditioner on a decent setting can cause the fans in the equipment not to work as hard. If the device is getting cooled the fans may not have to spin at higher RPMs to move air.  Proper airflow through your cabinets and racks helps greatly with this.  If you have your equipment taking cold air in from the front, where maybe a vent is in front of the cabinet door, this can greatly help.

Supplementing your cooling with a slow moving large fan.  Large fans spinning at low RPMs can move just as much air as smaller fans spinning at higher RPMs.  If your server room needs help this could be an option.

Proper cable management is also essential for airflow.  The better the air moves through the equipment the cooler the equipment will be.  As stated above, cooler equipment means fans are not spinning at high RPMs generating noise.

ePMP 3000: How to test MU-MIMO

http://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-3000-MU-MIMO/ePMP-3000-How-to-test-MU-MIMO/m-p/102882

Intial MU-MIMO testing after deployment can be performed through the built-in Wireless Link Test Tool.On Wirless link Test page new option has been added for ePMP3000 – Mode. Wireless Link Test can be started to Single SM or to Dual SMs simultaneously.

ePMP tip of the day

http://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-FAQ/How-does-the-GPS-Sync-Radio-utilize-the-Active-and-Inactive/m-p/82855#M143

ePMP GPS Sync Radio devices that have an onboard GPS contain two banks of flash memory which each contain a version of software.

The version of software last installed onto the device flash memory (using software upgrade procedures) is configured in the Active Bank. This software will be used by the device when the device is rebooted.

ePMP eDetect

One of the biggest tasks on a wireless AP is finding clean channels.  Once you find those clean channels, making sure you stay on a clean channel is the next task. ePMP has a feature under tools called eDetect. One of the things this can do is give you an idea of how many devices are on a given frequency.

The ePMP AP you see above is on a 20mhz channel, which is why many home routers and other devices are showing up.  If this was on a cleaner frequency it would look like the following.

While eDetect is not a replacement for spectrum analysis, it can give you a pretty good idea of what’s using a particular frequency.  Please note, you see the most things on 20MHZ channels because that is what most home routers are set to. If you would like to read up on eDetect in more detail go here: https://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-Configuration-Management/ePMP-Tools-eDetect-Explained/td-p/42997