Preseem releases access point paper

https://www.preseem.com/2019/06/wireless-access-point-market-insights/

Unlike spec sheets from manufacturers, Preseem collects real-world data from access points in all kinds of deployments and analyzes statistics at a top level to offer valuable insights. So, as part of our Fixed Wireless Network Report, we calculated wireless access point market insights on market share, connected subscriber count, performance on QoE metrics like latency and much more…

Pocket Ethernet should be in your toolkit

https://www.pockethernet.com/

Wiremap including shield
Check whether pins on RJ45 jacks have been crimped in the correct order. Pockethernet as well tests the shield for continuity.

TDR
Advanced cable testing with only one end connected to Pockethernet. Determine how long a cable is and if it contains any short circuits, split pairs or bad terminations. Pockethernet also detects if a cable is connected to a switched-off computer or switch.
Graphical TDR
Generate a graph of signal reflections throughout the entire cable length. You can view the length of connected cables and any imperfections they may have (such as extenders or patch panels).
VLAN support
Set the VLAN tags, PCP and DEI for outgoing DNS, DHCP, HTTP and Ping requests. View tagged and untagged traffic with the traffic monitor.
Network discovery (CDP, LLDP)

View the content of CDP and LLDP messages to identify network ports more easily. If the switch port supports it, you can instantly view the connected chassis and port ID as well as the native VLAN.

Voltage detection
Find out if any pairs have a phone line or passive PoE connected to them. This allows you to detect services and to protect your network equipment.
PoE supply detection

Measure the presence and voltage of Power over Ethernet to ensure a sufficient power supply for your PoE devices.

Cable toner with customizable tones
Determine the location of cables in a wall and identify single cables in batches or at patch panels. You can set different tones and even control their volume to keep signals separate.
Bit error rate test (10/100/1000)

Real-world cable quality measurement at gigabit speeds. Measure packet length, payload and configure the number of test packets.

Port blinker
Let Pockethernet toggle the Link LED on switches and routers to easily find the cable you are looking for. Set the link speed to toggle a change of color for the port LED.
Link speed and duplex identification (10/100/1000)

Find out the Ethernet capabilities of that unused port you’re wondering about and rule out duplex conflicts.

Link establishment test (10/100/1000)
Determine whether a link can be established at different speeds and make sure the wiring is up to date for gigabit.
DHCP, DNS, Ping, HTTP tests (10/100)

Test the network connection to see if you are able to get an IP address on a port, and connect to internal servers or the Internet.

Traffic detection (10/100)
View which other devices are reachable on a specific port, as well as the type and amount of traffic that is being directed there.
Generate PDF reports

Keep a detailed, up-to-date database and log of your work just by noting locations and port IDs.

Export your results

Email reports for your own records, or share them through a phone’s OS’s native share menu with the press of a button. No more lost reports, tedious downloads from the device or manual editing.

Small cells and network as a Service (NaaS)

In this article, I am going to talk about how WISPs can monetize their networks in the ever-growing hype of 5G. Whether you think 5G is hype, or overblown from a technical aspect, you need to embrace the 5G wave of hype and use it to your advantage.

Many WISPs should be familiar with 5G in terms of how small cells work from a technical, physical, and a philosophical viewpoint. This knowledge is important, as outlined in Small Cells and hybrid networks for WISPs: Part 1, as well as making your network attractive for Network as a Service (NaaS).

Small cell digital signage and cameras

Wireless Service providers, especially ones with active community ties, have a unique advantage over the larger providers such as Verizon and AT&T when it comes to small cells.  Many of the local WISPs have the contacts to be able to put up small cell infrastructure in their coverage areas.   The provider does not have to own any licensed cellular spectrum to do this.  Many WISPs can make a business model with unlicensed (2.4 and 5GHZ) and CBRS band. The big benefit of this is if these providers build this infrastructure in mind of selling space to the larger carriers, then it can be a huge benefit.  The local ISP is now selling its infrastructure. Many ISPs would rather have one client paying $1000 a month and 10 clients paying $100 a month.  With this, you can do both.

How do you do this? In an upcoming podcast, I am going to talk with Tolly Marcus from Airpacket about how WISPs can “up their game” to design and engineer their networks to be in-line with what the larger carriers’ design.  This mindset will focus on the thinking processes  ISPs need to start implementing into their own networks.

One of the things the local provider can start looking at is small cell poles. Companies like Wytec International are implementing the next-generation of smart poles.  These poles tie cellular, CBRS, wifi, iOT, and other technologies in an unobtrusive design. The photo below is from this month’s edition of AGL Magazine.

Inside of a next-generation smart pole

By looking at this pole we can see the many compartments inside. Cities like this design as it covers ugly wires and just kind of blends in.  So, what does this have to do with the WISP? If a WISP were to design and engineer these to take into account the designs the carriers mentioned earlier require then the network can be sold as a service to them. Many factors and things need to be met, but it is doable. Again, the WISP does not have to operate in the Cellular bands in order to put up the pole infrastructure.

WISP puts up these throughout the town or city they can leave options for a carrier or multiple carriers to add their equipment into existing infrastructure.  The local ISP is selling capacity on a purpose-built network they have control over instead of the large carrier rolling over them.  The addition of small cells also opens up additional opportunities for the local ISP which otherwise might go to a 5G carrier.

Some of the opportunities to the local ISP can be
•Cellular Small Cells
•Digital Signage and displays
•Public Wi-Fi
•Survelliance
•IoT networks
•Meter Reading
•Informational Kiosks
These services are just a few of the ones an ISP with local connections can provide many services needed while selling to carriers who are already deploying small cells. 
In closing, if you are an ISP, especially a WISP use the 5G hype to further your business instead of trying to fight it. Adapt what you need to your business model to help provide the next generation of services.  Don’t get hung up on semantics.