CBRSCertified Professional Installer (CPI Package)

This six-module program, developed by Google, will train you to be a Certificated Professional Installer (CPI) of radios which utilize the Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) band to provide communications infrastructure. Upon completing the course and passing the online certification exam*, you will receive your CPI credentials* and your information will be automatically registered with WInnForum*.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/google-cbrs-cpi-training

ePMP 3000: How to test MU-MIMO

http://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-3000-MU-MIMO/ePMP-3000-How-to-test-MU-MIMO/m-p/102882

Intial MU-MIMO testing after deployment can be performed through the built-in Wireless Link Test Tool.On Wirless link Test page new option has been added for ePMP3000 – Mode. Wireless Link Test can be started to Single SM or to Dual SMs simultaneously.

ePMP tip of the day

http://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-FAQ/How-does-the-GPS-Sync-Radio-utilize-the-Active-and-Inactive/m-p/82855#M143

ePMP GPS Sync Radio devices that have an onboard GPS contain two banks of flash memory which each contain a version of software.

The version of software last installed onto the device flash memory (using software upgrade procedures) is configured in the Active Bank. This software will be used by the device when the device is rebooted.

ePMP eDetect

One of the biggest tasks on a wireless AP is finding clean channels.  Once you find those clean channels, making sure you stay on a clean channel is the next task. ePMP has a feature under tools called eDetect. One of the things this can do is give you an idea of how many devices are on a given frequency.

The ePMP AP you see above is on a 20mhz channel, which is why many home routers and other devices are showing up.  If this was on a cleaner frequency it would look like the following.

While eDetect is not a replacement for spectrum analysis, it can give you a pretty good idea of what’s using a particular frequency.  Please note, you see the most things on 20MHZ channels because that is what most home routers are set to. If you would like to read up on eDetect in more detail go here: https://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-Configuration-Management/ePMP-Tools-eDetect-Explained/td-p/42997

The addition of RF elements horns to a PTP550 link

Originally posted at:
http://www.mtin.net/blog/the-addition-of-rf-elements-horns-to-a-ptp550-link/

In a previous series of articles we talked about a new Cambium 550 link and the noise challenges we had.  You can start your reading in Part one and Part two.

Due to the frequency challenges, we decided to upgrade the dishes to RF Elements Ultra Horns.

If you recall our spectrum looked like this before.

After the horns. While not a night and day difference you will notice several improvements across the band.  Less red and yellow on the scan and sharper drop-offs. We saw the most improvement in the 5160 area and the 5720 ranges.  And this is with the horns pointed right at the source of most of the 5GHZ noise.   Not much you can do if you are pointed right at the noise.

What did this mean for the link? It meant we were able to find a 200 meg increase because we were able to obtain better modulation on the link.

So while we were not able to filter out all of the noise we wanted, we were able to increase our MCS rates on a very noisy link to increase bandwidth and increase the reliability of the link.  Before the horns, the MCS rates would be in a constant state of flux dealing with noise.

States and Small Cell laws

http://www.ncsl.org/research/telecommunications-and-information-technology/mobile-5g-and-small-cell-legislation.aspx

Twenty-one state legislatures—Arizona, ColoradoDelawareFloridaHawaiiIllinoisIndianaIowaKansas, Michigan, MinnesotaMissouri, New Mexico, North CarolinaOhioOklahoma, Rhode Island, TennesseeTexasUtah, and Virginia—have enacted small cell legislation that streamlines regulations to facilitate the deployment of 5G small cells.

These laws all take into consideration the unique circumstances of their state and local environment, but baseline principles can be established and are consistent with wireless industry standards, including:

  • Streamlined applications to access public rights-of-way.
  • Caps on costs and fees.
  • Streamlined timelines for the consideration and processing of cell siting applications.

Ac Wave 1 vs Wave 2

There has been much discussion on the performance of going from an N Series outdoor wireless system to AC.  Not all AC is created equal.  Right now there is AC Wave 1 and AC Wave 2.  Just about all the AC stuff currently in the pipeline for outdoor wireless is wave 1.  There is wave 2 indoor gear available, but for a WISP you are interested in the outdoor gear.

So what’s the difference?
For some reading about spatial streams, channel sizes, etc. look at this article https://info.hummingbirdnetworks.com/blog/80211ac-wave-2-vs-wave-1-difference

For the WISP folks who want the Cliff Notes version here are some key differences.

-Wave 1 uses 20,40,and 80 Mhz Channels.  Wave 2 can support 80 and 160mhz channels.  The 160mhz channel would be two 80mhz channels bonded together.

-Wave 1 can do 3 spatial streams.  Wave 2 does 4. This requires an additional antenna to take advantage of wave2.  This is a hardware upgrade from wave1 to wave 2.

-Wave 2 supports MU-MIMO. The AP can talk to 4 clients individually at once.  The client must also support this, which is a hardware upgrade from wave 1 to wave 2 on both the client and the AP.

The question to ask your vendors is what is the upgrade path if you are using existing AC gear.  If you are running AC currently you are most assuredly going to have to replace your AP radios and antennas.  Will your existing clients work with the new AC wave 2 aps? An important thing to ask.

Flash Briefing: April 29. Spectrum, IoT, WPA compromises

Spectrum use Article
https://www.networkworld.com/article/3343040/wireless-spectrum-shortage-not-so-fast.html
The wireless industry has always had to deal with regular (and alarming) pronouncements that we’re somehow running out of radio spectrum. We’re not. But the misconception regardless gives many IT and network managers pause. 

It does not mention WiSPs, but is a perspective nonetheless.

IoT Links
How many of you are focusing on Internet of Everything (IoT)? I have posted some links to how healthcare and others are using IoT to further their business.  As a service provider, you should be coming up with an IoT strategy.

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/331792
https://www.worldbuild365.com/blog/internet-of-things-iot-the-future-of-smart-roads-skRTWO

WPA Compromises
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/04/11/bughunters_punch_holes_in_wpa3_wifi_security/

Microsoft and IPV6

I have written about IPV6 lately and Microsoft has published a post where they are moving their internal network to an IPV6 only network.

Microsoft works toward IPv6-only single stack network

TeamArin at CanWISP
https://teamarin.net/2019/04/02/how-arin-can-help-wireless-internet-service-providers-wisps/